Category Archives: To Do !

Materials List for B-Block

In preparation for coming back from Spring Break, please prepare yourself for your B-Block classes.

Click here to see a list of groups for Spring and here to find out 2014 Spring schedule. Click here to see the MakeLAB Materials List and the rest of the Spring Material Lists. This is a list of what you will need to bring back to campus.

Safe travels back to campus! Please get in touch if you have any questions.

Katie, Angie, and Ted

WELCOME BACK! Spring 2014 Important Information

Several things will be different in both the structure and the content of Foundations in the spring semester. Firstly I have re-assigned groups. There are 4 groups of approx. 25 students; they are called A, B, C and D Groups. Each group will be engaged in a series of 4 half semester workshop classes called LABs. The LABs continue and expand upon concepts that were introduced in the fall semester.

The first week back from break the whole class will be involved in a group activity you will be engaged in a bookmaking workshop that involves library research and the compilation of images and text. Click here to find a series of worksheets that will help you to gather information and materials for the workshop. We will meet in the Harder Hall studio at 8 am on Tuesday, January 21st please bring a notebook and your completed homework to class that day.

Click here to see a list of groups for Spring and here to find out 2014 Spring schedule. Click here to see the MAKE_student_materials_spring_2014 and the rest of the Spring 2014 Materials Lists. This is a list of what you will need to bring back to campus.

Safe travels back to campus! Please get in touch if you have any questions.

Katie, Angie, and Ted

Questions for YOU!

1. Did you register?

2. Do you have at least 12 credits and not more than 18?

3. Did you sign up for at least one Art History AND an Art History Lab for each section? (Also make sure that you are not taking more than ONE during the same block!)

4. Do you know what writing course you should take?  (If not, see the registration post to learn how your test scores help determine this.)

5. Did you get all your technology, materials, and book?

Check over your schedule! It’s important to have this all finished before you arrive.

See you soon!

A Message from REPO

Salutations from REPO!
Join us…for the first meeting and clean out!

When: Today, Tuesday AUG 28th, 1pm to 6pm (clean out) 4 pm (meeting)
Where: Repo, the storage container located next to the outdoor kilns and lower Harder parking lot
What: An official Repo meeting will take place at 4:00 pm outside the container during the clean up, where we will be discussing future plans for Repo. If you cannot attend shoot us an e-mail expressing your ideas or interest at repo@alfred.edu
Why: Come on down to score free materials, say your two cents, and lend a much needed hand for the old girl’s beginning semester cleaning. Layers of undocumented materials will be unearthed for the first time! Be there to take part in the miracle!
Contact: REPO,  repo@alfred.edu or  http://repo.alfred.edu/.

Thanks to Timefortea3 for the image. Check out more: http://www.flickr.com/photos/timefortea3/sets/72157622155428698/with/4607498713/.

First Day 2012!

Monday we will be meeting in Harder Hall in the Foundations Studio at 8am. Please be on time since we will be jump-starting things rather quickly.

Please bring with you your Tool Kit, Home Map, Special Object and Sketchbook/Pen.

While you did not need to buy your Tool Kit from AU, it is required for all students. If you did not pre-order a Tool Kit and need one, the Bookstore does have extra for sale, but please act fast since they are limited. You will not need your book, How to Be an Explorer of the World, just yet.

Continue reading

so what is the first week project?

The First Week Project is a way to bring all of you together and introduce you to each other, the program and the community of Alfred. This year we have invited the international artists Joanna Wright and Alex Ashcroft to design and lead a week-long project called HUNT. You will all begin the week by bringing a special object and a map from your home town to class. This will help us think about where we come from and through discussions and presentations about maps and place, we will begin to explore how place influences us. Continue reading

Register for classes (should be DONE!)

Purchase Art Kit Materials and Book

Purchase Technology (computer, camera, printer +)

Collect Material Archive

Pack a map from my hometown and an object that is IMPORTANT to me.

Read First Assignment, Bruce Mau’s ‘Incomplete Manifesto for Growth’ (on this site under readings)

Bruce Mau’s ‘Incomplete Manifesto for Growth’

(psst, this is your first reading!)

Bruce Mau is the Creative Director of Bruce Mau Design, based in Toronto, Canada. In 2003, he founded the Institute Without Boundaries, a twelve-month interdisciplinary postgraduate program that aims to produce a new breed of designer, one who is, “a synthesis of artist, inventor, mechanic, objective economist, and evolutionary strategist. “ Mau is an exemplar of creativity, and in his “Incomplete Manifesto for Growth” articulates his beliefs, motivations and strategies. To read the full list go to his site: http://umcf.umn.edu/events/past/04nov-manifesto.pdf

1. Allow events to change you. You have to be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it. You live it. The prerequisites for growth: the openness to experience events and the willingness to be changed by them.
2. Forget about good. Good is a known quantity. Good is what we all agree on. Growth is not necessarily good. Growth is an exploration of unlit recesses that may or may not yield to our research. As long as you stick to good you’ll never have real growth.
3. Process is more important than outcome. When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we’ve already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there.
4. Love your experiments (as you would an ugly child). Joy is the engine of growth. Take the long view and allow yourself the fun of failure every day.
5. Go deep. The deeper you go, the more likely you will discover something of value.
6. Capture accidents. The wrong answer is the right answer in search of a different question. Collect wrong answers as part of the process.
7. Drift.  Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism.
8. Begin anywhere. John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere.
9. Learn to follow when it makes sense. Let anyone lead.
10. Keep moving. The market and its operations have a tendency to reinforce success. Resist it. Allow failure and migration to be part of your practice.
11. Slow down. Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves.
12. Don’t be cool. Cool is conservative fear dressed in black.
13. Ask stupid questions. Growth is fueled by desire and innocence. Assess the answer, not the question. Imagine learning throughout your life at the rate of an infant.
14. Collaborate. The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.
15. ____________________. Intentionally left blank. Allow space for the ideas you haven’t had yet, and for the ideas of others.
16. Work the metaphor. Every object has the capacity to stand for something other than what is apparent. Work on what it stands for.
17. Be careful to take risks. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.
18. Repeat yourself. If you like it, do it again. If you don’t like it, do it again.
19. Stand on someone’s shoulders. You can travel farther carried on the accomplishments of those who came before you. And the view is so much better.
20. Don’t clean your desk. You might find something tomorrow that you can’t see tonight.
21. Think with your mind. Forget technology. Creativity is not device-dependent.
22. Organization = Liberty. Real innovation in design, or any other field, happens in context. That context is usually some form of cooperatively managed enterprise. Frank Gehry, for instance, is only able to realize Bilbao because his studio can deliver it on budget. The myth of a split between “creatives” and “suits” is … a ‘charming artifact of the past.’
23. Don’t borrow money. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed.
24. Listen carefully. Every collaborator who enters our orbit brings with him or her a world more strange and complex than any we could ever hope to imagine. By listening to the details and the subtlety of their needs, desires, or ambitions, we fold their world onto our own.
25. Take field trips. The bandwidth of the world is greater than that of your TV set.
26. Make mistakes faster. Break it, stretch it, bend it, crush it, crack it, fold it.
27. Explore the other edge. Great liberty exists when we avoid trying to run with the technological pack. We can’t find the leading edge because it’s trampled underfoot.
28. Avoid fields. Jump fences. Disciplinary boundaries and regulatory regimes are attempts to control the wilding of creative life. Our job is to jump the fences and cross the fields.
30. Remember. Without memory, innovation is merely novelty. History gives growth a direction.
31. Laugh. People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I’ve become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves.

thanks to Mary Stewart who sent this my way!