Author Archives: alfredfoundations

Bruce Mau’s ‘Incomplete Manifesto for Growth’

from-superman-to-the-avengers-5

Bruce Mau is the Creative Director of , based in Toronto, Canada. In 2003, he founded the Institute Without Boundaries, a twelve-month interdisciplinary postgraduate program that aims to produce a new breed of designer, one who is, “a synthesis of artist, inventor, mechanic, objective economist, and evolutionary strategist. “ Mau is an exemplar of creativity, and in his “Incomplete Manifesto for Growth” articulates his beliefs, motivations and strategies. To read the full list go to his site: http://umcf.umn.edu/events/past/04nov-manifesto.pdf

1. Allow events to change you. You have to be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it. You live it. The prerequisites for growth: the openness to experience events and the willingness to be changed by them.
2. Forget about good. Good is a known quantity. Good is what we all agree on. Growth is not necessarily good. Growth is an exploration of unlit recesses that may or may not yield to our research. As long as you stick to good you’ll never have real growth.
3. Process is more important than outcome. When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we’ve already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there.
4. Love your experiments (as you would an ugly child). Joy is the engine of growth. Take the long view and allow yourself the fun of failure every day.
5. Go deep. The deeper you go, the more likely you will discover something of value.
6. Capture accidents. The wrong answer is the right answer in search of a different question. Collect wrong answers as part of the process.
7. Drift.  Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism.
8. Begin anywhere. John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere.
9. Learn to follow when it makes sense. Let anyone lead.
10. Keep moving. The market and its operations have a tendency to reinforce success. Resist it. Allow failure and migration to be part of your practice.
11. Slow down. Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves.
12. Don’t be cool. Cool is conservative fear dressed in black.
13. Ask stupid questions. Growth is fueled by desire and innocence. Assess the answer, not the question. Imagine learning throughout your life at the rate of an infant.
14. Collaborate. The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.
15. ____________________. Intentionally left blank. Allow space for the ideas you haven’t had yet, and for the ideas of others.
16. Work the metaphor. Every object has the capacity to stand for something other than what is apparent. Work on what it stands for.
17. Be careful to take risks. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.
18. Repeat yourself. If you like it, do it again. If you don’t like it, do it again.
19. Stand on someone’s shoulders. You can travel farther carried on the accomplishments of those who came before you. And the view is so much better.
20. Don’t clean your desk. You might find something tomorrow that you can’t see tonight.
21. Think with your mind. Forget technology. Creativity is not device-dependent.
22. Organization = Liberty. Real innovation in design, or any other field, happens in context. That context is usually some form of cooperatively managed enterprise. Frank Gehry, for instance, is only able to realize Bilbao because his studio can deliver it on budget. The myth of a split between “creatives” and “suits” is … a ‘charming artifact of the past.’
23. Don’t borrow money. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed.
24. Listen carefully. Every collaborator who enters our orbit brings with him or her a world more strange and complex than any we could ever hope to imagine. By listening to the details and the subtlety of their needs, desires, or ambitions, we fold their world onto our own.
25. Take field trips. The bandwidth of the world is greater than that of your TV set.
26. Make mistakes faster. Break it, stretch it, bend it, crush it, crack it, fold it.
27. Explore the other edge. Great liberty exists when we avoid trying to run with the technological pack. We can’t find the leading edge because it’s trampled underfoot.
28. Avoid fields. Jump fences. Disciplinary boundaries and regulatory regimes are attempts to control the wilding of creative life. Our job is to jump the fences and cross the fields.
30. Remember. Without memory, innovation is merely novelty. History gives growth a direction.
31. Laugh. People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I’ve become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves.

thanks to Mary Stewart who sent this my way!

First Time Registration

SCHOOL OF ART AND DESIGN
FOUNDATION STUDENT REGISTRATION
FALL SEMESTER 2016

Please read the following Questions + Answers carefully before registering for your Fall Semester classes. While this process can be complex for the first-timer, the following suggestions will help answer most of your questions. To get started, assemble and read the information sent to you from the Alfred University Registrar’s Office. This includes Custom-printed registration Planning Form with Name, ID#, and Alternate PIN, Instructions for a first-time login to BannerWeb, and Web Registration Guide.

Questions + Answers__________________________________________________

How do I register and use BannerWeb?
All students register online on the BannerWeb site. Refer to the instructions for a first-time login to BannerWeb that was part of your information packet from the Registrar. You will also need the other information from that mailing to fully register (especially your ID and Pin Number and the BannerWeb Registration Guide.) If you did not receive an Information packet please contact the Registrar’s office at 607-871-2123 or e-mail registrar@alfred.edu.

What is a typical Program for Freshman Year?
Foundation Art (101 & 102) 16 credits (8 per semester)
Art History (3 two credit courses ARTH 120, 130, 140) 6 credits
English (101 or 102) 4 credits
Humanities (1, 100 or 200 level only) 4 credits

What are the BFA Requirements?
A minimum of 128 credits are required for graduation from Alfred University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art and Design. You are encouraged to track your own progress toward graduation by keeping records based on successful completion of course work. You can review your progress toward graduation on the Banner system.

The total of 128 credits must be distributed as follows:
Studio 72
Writing 4
Humanities 8
Other academics 13
Art History 17
Electives 14
Senior project 0
Total 128
PHED 4 (additional PHED credits may not be used toward elective requirement.)
Total 132

So how many credits should I take?
A minimum of 30 credits should be completed by the end of the first year so that you can go on to sophomore year. A normal load is 16 credits, but students have the option to take as little as 12 or up to 18 credits depending on their abilities, schedule and outside activities. If a student chooses to take 14 credits in the Fall they will be required to complete at least 16 in the Spring for a total of 30 to register as a sophomore. Additional tuition is charged for more than 18 credits and must be approved by the Dean, unless the student is in the Honors Program.

How do I register for the Foundation Program?
All students accepted into the BFA Foundation Program must register for 8 credits of Foundation l (10676-ART101-001). Go to BannerWeb, follow the instructions and begin by adding this course! Students will be assigned specific sections once they arrive on campus. After you add this course you will have registered for a total of 8 credits.

What’s the Foundation Schedule?
The Foundation Program meets every morning, five days per week. On Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday studio classes start at 8:00 until 11:00 am. On Wednesday mornings, the entire freshman class gets together for group activities, films, field trips, lectures and discussions from 9:00 until 11:15 am. When you are planning your schedule keep in mind that your Academic and other courses will need to be scheduled around these time slots.

What about Art History?
Refer to either your paper copy or the Alfred website for the Class Schedule Listing for Fall. You will notice that the Art History course numbers start with ARTH 12_, ARTH13_ or ARTH14_. Each of these courses are worth 2 credits. To complete the Art History requirement for the first year you must take one class beginning with each of those prefixes for a total of 6 credits. You will take one course one semester and the other two during the other semester. All course numbers are offered each of the two semesters and do not need to be taken in numerical sequence. It is very important that you complete all three of these courses before the end of your freshman year, since you will not be able to take them again until you are a Junior.

The Art History courses meet for only 7 weeks or one half semester, so two may be taken in one semester. We refer to these half semesters as A Block (first 7 weeks) and B Block (second 7 weeks).  The Class Schedule Listing on Banner indicates which half of the semester each course meets. It is not recommended that you take two of these courses during the same 1/2 semester block. Please be aware of this when scheduling. In addition each art history course is to be taken concurrently with a 0 credit discussion class which meets once a week on Wednesday evenings.  These plenary courses are meant to enhance the art history classes through the presentation of films, lesson review and an introduction to the library and research methods.  **  During  registration students must for art history and the discussion section at the same time.

What about my English and Humanities Requirements?
With few exceptions, all students should take one English course and one Humanities course in their first year. Both courses are assigned 4 credits and should not be taken in the same semester. It makes no difference which semester you choose to take one or the other, although if writing has not been your strength you may want to consider taking your writing requirement first as it will help your success in other classes.

Can you tell me more about the Writing Requirement?
Students should register for the appropriate level course depending upon their scores on college entrance exams. School of Art and Design students will adhere to criteria utilized by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for placement in ENGL 101, 102 or exempt. These courses may be limited, so if you do not get in the first semester, you certainly will in the Spring.

                 SAT Writing                  SAT                          ACT

ENGL 101       499 or below                 539 or below           25 or below

ENGL 102       500 – 699                        540 – 739                  26 – 29

Exempt            700 or above                740 or above            30 or above

Can you explain the Humanities Requirement with a little more detail?  Over the course of your 4 years of studies you will be required to take 8 credits (2 courses) of Humanities. ** We recommend that students take at least 1, 4 credit course in the first year of study.  These courses are organized into areas or groups. You will be choosing one course from B or D, and one from the Other Humanities or A areas. Below I’ve listed the requirements and course names, but the best way to make sure that you are taking a course that fulfills the BFA humanities requirement is to go to BannerWeb. Once there, go to Class Schedule, scroll down to Attribute type and select either .BFA:Humanties (Area B or D) or BFA: Other Humanities. Only courses that fulfill the requirement will be listed for that semester. Keep in mind that topics change each semester.  So you may want to plan ahead if there is a specific course you’d like to take in the future!

You will need to take one 4-credit course from among 100-200 level offerings listed under:
BFA: Humanities (area B or D course attribute)  Here are a few examples, there are many more, so refer to the online registration lists or the check sheet!
The World in the 20th Century-13626 HIST 107-01
The World in the 20th Century-13042 HIST 107-02
The Making of Europe 13617 HIST 110-01
The Rise and Fall of Iberia, 1450-1950-11657 HIST 151-01
American History 12465 HIST 211-01
American History 10208 HIST 211-02
Introduction to Philosophy 10302 PHIL 101-01
Introduction to Philosophy 13609 PHIL 101-02
Ethics 12651 PHIL 281-02
Philosophy of the Arts I 10304 PHIL 282-01
Introduction to World Religions 13242 RLGS 105-02
Birth of the Christian Tradition 13621 RLGS 254-01

The second humanities must be a 4-credit 100-200 level course from (area B or D) or from the BFA Other Humanities (course attribute) Here are a few examples, there are many more, so refer to the online registration lists or the check sheet!
Cultural Anthropology 10001 ANTH 110-01
Mass Media and American Life 10033 COMM 110-01
20th Century Poetry 13700 ENGL 216-01
Tales of King Arthur 13743 ENGL 221-01
Shakespeare in Cinema 12516 ENGL 225-01
American Politics 10351 POLS 110-01
American Politics 10352 POLS 110-02
World Politics 12825 POLS 271-01
Introduction to Sociology 10404 SOCI 110-01
Introduction to Theatre 13792 THEA 110-01

What is the check sheet? The BFA Check sheet, and other check sheets are templates for what you need to graduate with a given degree. There is one for each Art History, Bachelor of Fine Art and Art Education. For up-to-date sheets, check outside the School of Art Dean’s Office or go to the main website where you can learn more about the programs and get a copy of the check sheets http://art.alfred.edu/undergrad/.

What if I am interested in the Art Education Program? Students interested in Art Education will not need to register for any special classes at this time. You will learn more about the program and it’s requirements once here. If you just can’t wait and want to learn more, contact Prof. Corrie Burdick, the awesome Art Ed educator at burdickcb@alfred.edu.

What if I am a Transfer or Honors student? Transfer and Honor students may wish to make adjustments or additions to their schedule. Help is available by calling Betsy Kent at kent@alfred.edu or at 607-871-2441.

Are there other options that I might consider?
The University has many 2 credit offerings that are popular with students. Many Foundations students take courses in the Performing Arts including Music, Dance, and Theater. Spend some time looking over the course offerings for Fall. Sign up for something that really interests you! This is the time to explore new things or build on skills that you have already started to develop. If you are thinking about study abroad, then you might want to learn more about a specific country or take a language. And remember, you don’t have to do it all in the first semester, you have four years!

I have a question that you haven’t answered, who can I talk to?
For questions related to the on-line registration system and BannerWeb contact the Registrar’s office at 607-871-2123 or e-mail registrar@alfred.edu. For questions related to School of Art registration contact Betsy Kent: kent@alfred.edu or at 607-871-2441.

You may also take a moment and visit the Alfred University, School of Art and Design website at http://art.alfred.edu. There you can access lots of information about your school!


Technology Guide

You are about to enter college as an Art student! Over the coming years you will learn loads of new ways to think-act-make as an artist. During that time, you’ll be introduced to a number of digital processes. While some entering freshmen have been using computers daily for art-making others may view this as new ground. In the Foundation program, you will be asked to use a computer daily to check email, make a blog, print out images, made videos, and a variety of other tasks. Towards that end, you will need to purchase a computer and other technology to support your learning. In an effort to help you in your search, we have provided the following Technology Guide.

For your first year of study, we highly recommend that you bring to school a Mac laptop computer, digital camera, and printer. A flash drive**, extra printer cartridges, and a variety of regular and photo paper** are also recommended. It is convenient to have them on hand and buying them ahead of time may be your least expensive option. We would suggest that you bring with you any of the following if you already OWN them, but they are not required for coursework: cell phone, ipod, or digital recorder.

You may find that you already own some of the suggested items. If this is true for you, it is perfectly fine to start the year with what you have and see how they work for your specific needs. If you do need to purchase new, we have found that buying from a reputable online business is one of the most effective ways to get the most for your money. These sites also can provide product information and customer reviews that are very helpful in choosing the best model for your needs.

What model you select will depend on your individual needs, what you want to spend, and your areas of interest. For example, if you intend to study in the Expanded Media Division you may want to consider a more expansive computer or if you plan to study photography, a Digital SLR camera.

Computer
You’ll use a computer most days at Alfred, from checking your email (a Foundations requirement) to researching and writing papers, to adjusting images and printing them. A computer is an expensive investment and should be bought according to your needs, so consider several things: where and when will you most likely use it, a Mac or a PC, a laptop or desk model, what level of computer you need, your future goals and how much money you want to spend.

• While the university as a whole uses PCs, the School of Art + Design and most artists/designers use Apple computers. We therefor recommend that if you are purchasing a new computer, it be an Apple.

• Watch out for incentives, often you can get a printer or iPod with your computer purchase. Currently Apple has a great incentive along with an education discount for a laptop: Apple Offer

• Many people find that a laptop is the best choice because you can bring it to class, the library or a coffee shop.

*One note, some of you may be considering purchasing an iPad, while this is a great tool, it does have limitations. Please be aware of the differences before you purchase.

Digital Camera
During the year you will be asked to use a camera for visual research and to document your work. Select a camera that fits your needs+ and budget. For most a compact model with at least 16 megapixels will work for most people. Since the quality of your images will be important, it is best to buy a good quality brand with the highest resolution you can afford. A couple good choices might be a Canon, Panasonic, Nikon, Olympus, or Sony.

You will find the best selection, lowest prices and most information by purchasing a digital camera online. Following are several reputable sites that faculty members have used over the years. You might start by checking the sites that provide a buying guide and reviews first (http://reviews.cnet.com/) and then look at Bizrate (www.bizrate.com), Epinions (http://www.epinions.com) or Price Grabber (http://www.pricegrabber.com) to see who offers the least expensive price after you have selected the model you desire. With a little research you can find an excellent resolution digital camera for a reasonable price.

You might also want to purchase additional storage for your camera. Most come with a CompactFlash, Smartmedia or other PC card, but usually this is not large enough to store many photos.

+Just a note, if you are planning on taking Photography courses you will need a digital SLR (single lens reflex) camera for Sophomore Photography. If you do buy DSLR you should consider purchasing a protective UV filter for your lens. Of course, these items do not need to be purchased for this school year.

++Another note: We have found that while cellphone cameras are improving they still do not provide the print quality that you will need for the course.

Printer
Many times you will be asked to print out images from your digital camera or the internet and bring them to the class the next day. It is often difficult to find a color printer on campus for this purpose. We recommend that you purchase or bring with you a color inkjet printer that prints at least 8.5 x 11. Printers have come way down in price and sometimes are bundled with a computer purchase. You might also considering purchasing one together with your roommate. Excellent choices would be any inexpensive Canon, HP or Epson printer. Remember to purchase extra cartridges, they are much cheaper online and you will run out!

USB Flash Drive or Thumb drive**
You will need to purchase a flash drive. These small devices make it easy to take your files to a printer or to share images. They hold lots of data and start at about $7 for a 4 Gigabit.

Things to remember
Printer cartridges (online is cheaper)
Inkjet Paper: photo, regular **
Extra storage card for your camera

**Note: Included in Art Kit.

Additional Art-making Tools (bring if you already own)

Cell phone
Digital recorder

Online Purchasing
Apple (www.apple.com)
MacWorld (www.macworld.com)
PCWorld (www.pcworld.com)
J&R (www.jr.com)
B&H (www.bhphotovideo.com)
Adorama (www.adorama.com)

Reviews +Price Comparison
Bizrate (www.bizrate.com)
Epinions (www.epinions.com)
Price Grabber (www.pricegrabber.com)

Better Photo (www.betterphoto.com)
Digital Photography Review (www.dpreview.com)
Digital Camera Review (www.digitalcamerareview.com)
Cnet reviews (reviews.cnet.com)
Consumer Reports (www.online.consumerreports.org)

Attendance Policy

All Foundation courses are governed by the Foundations Attendance Policy. The policy is as follows:

Attendance is not only mandatory but it is crucial to your success in Foundations. Roll is taken daily in all workshops as well as for the Wednesday meeting. There are no ‘excused’ absences, you are either in class or absent. We understand that you may get sick or experience other difficult situations over the course of a semester, therefore we allow up to three absences without reducing your grade. Keep in mind that this is three absences for the entire semester across all Foundations class and including the Wednesday meeting. On the fourth absence,  your grade will be lowered by a half grade. (Ex. B to B-)  Please be on time, as three tardies are the equivalent of one absence. Ten or more absences will result in automatic failure of Foundations.

While we do not require a note from a doctor or any other documentation relating to your absence, we encourage you to talk to your faculty if you have an emergency that causes you to miss class. Please also share the information with either Profs. Angie To, Katarina Riesing and Sara Ferguson.